ExcelGOB-2008

1 11 2008

La Organización de los Estados Americanos (OEA) y el Instituto para la Conectividad en las Américas (ICA-IDRC) lanzan la segunda edición de los premios de gobierno electrónico “excelGOB”.

Entidades públicas de 32 países de América Latina y el Caribe pueden ser considerados para estos premios, que reconocerán a los responsables de implementar las mejores soluciones para fortalecer la eficiencia en la gestión pública y el uso de canales innovadores en el marco de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación (TIC). Se aceptarán candidaturas de instituciones vinculadas a los poderes Ejecutivo, Legislativo, Judicial u otros servicios del gobierno central.

Hay dos categorías: eficiencia en la gestión pública y uso de teléfonos celulares para el gobierno electrónico (m-gobierno) Los ganadores en ambas categorías serán premiados con una visita técnica a Canadá, país sede del ICA-IDRC, para conocer en el terreno los avances canadienses en el uso de tecnología para la gestión pública, y a la vez recibirán diez becas de formación en gobierno electrónico a través de los diferentes cursos ofrecidos por la OEA.  Habrá tres menciones especiales en cada rubro.

Cualquier persona o institución puede presentar tantas candidaturas como desee para los Premios excelGOB, completando un sencillo formulario en línea (ver detalles en www.redgealc.net/excelGOB2008).  Un grupo de especialistas de toda la región analizará las candidaturas y seleccionará a ocho finalistas, los cuales serán valorados por un jurado de destacados expertos en el tema de la sociedad del conocimiento. El plazo para presentar candidaturas vence el 15 de Noviembre a las 11 pm (hora de Washington DC).

www.redgealc.netexcelgob@redgealc.net

Anuncios




ExcelGOB-2008

1 11 2008

La Organización de los Estados Americanos (OEA) y el Instituto para la Conectividad en las Américas (ICA-IDRC) lanzan la segunda edición de los premios de gobierno electrónico “excelGOB”.

Entidades públicas de 32 países de América Latina y el Caribe pueden ser considerados para estos premios, que reconocerán a los responsables de implementar las mejores soluciones para fortalecer la eficiencia en la gestión pública y el uso de canales innovadores en el marco de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación (TIC). Se aceptarán candidaturas de instituciones vinculadas a los poderes Ejecutivo, Legislativo, Judicial u otros servicios del gobierno central.

Hay dos categorías: eficiencia en la gestión pública y uso de teléfonos celulares para el gobierno electrónico (m-gobierno) Los ganadores en ambas categorías serán premiados con una visita técnica a Canadá, país sede del ICA-IDRC, para conocer en el terreno los avances canadienses en el uso de tecnología para la gestión pública, y a la vez recibirán diez becas de formación en gobierno electrónico a través de los diferentes cursos ofrecidos por la OEA.  Habrá tres menciones especiales en cada rubro.

Cualquier persona o institución puede presentar tantas candidaturas como desee para los Premios excelGOB, completando un sencillo formulario en línea (ver detalles en www.redgealc.net/excelGOB2008).  Un grupo de especialistas de toda la región analizará las candidaturas y seleccionará a ocho finalistas, los cuales serán valorados por un jurado de destacados expertos en el tema de la sociedad del conocimiento. El plazo para presentar candidaturas vence el 15 de Noviembre a las 11 pm (hora de Washington DC).

www.redgealc.netexcelgob@redgealc.net





Obama’s Cellphone Army

28 10 2008

IPOD POLITICS

Obama’s Cellphone Army

Swing Voters Are As Far Away As A Yalie’s Laptop

http://www.courant.com/

YALE STUDENTS, including Seth Extein, from left, from Boca Raton, Fla., Sarah Turbow, of Brooklyn, N.Y., and Emily Auchincloss, of Weston, make calls for the Obama campaign to voters in Florida. They’re gathered at a phone bank in the common area of Yale’s Berkeley College. (BOB MACDONNELL / HARTFORD COURANT / October 22, 2008)

LaTisha Campbell perched on a couch inside the Gothic common room at Yale University, holding a cellphone to her ear and balancing her MacBook Pro on her lap.

An Obama campaign website filled the screen, listing the undecided voter in Florida who Campbell was calling by name (Emma), age (49) and gender (female). Her iPod Touch lay within arm’s reach, open to a page detailing Obama’s education platform, just in case the voter wanted to talk about the issue.

Emma wasn’t home, but the person on the line told Campbell that Emma was no longer undecided.

“Yay!” Campbell, an 18-year-old freshman, said after the call ended. “The person’s already supporting!”

She clicked a button on the Obama website to indicate that she had left a message, hit the “Save and Next Voter” button and moved on to her next call.

All around Campbell, students were sprawled across couches and clustered on the floor, with laptops open and cellphones to their ears as the room filled with the hum of a political campaign.

“I am calling to see if you will be supporting Barack Obama in the November presidential election.”

“Barack Obama is the only candidate who’s gonna cut taxes for 95 percent.”

“We just want to make sure voting is an easy process for you.”

For four hours several nights a week, a room at Yale turns into an Obama phone bank, where any student with a cellphone and a laptop can become a virtual campaign worker, chatting up undecided voters in battleground states from the comfort of a dorm in uncontested Connecticut.

Campaign volunteers still campaign the old-fashioned way, but at Yale and elsewhere, campaigns are increasingly turning to technology, engaging supporters in new ways and — in the process — dramatically changing the way people participate in elections.

Both Obama and John McCain have profiles on Facebook, MySpace and other social networking sites. Both campaigns keep blogs, run Internet ads and send e-mail updates to supporters.

Obama has shattered fundraising records in part by soliciting funds by e-mail. He announced his pick for vice president in a mass text message to supporters. There’s even an Obama application for the iPhone, which sorts your contacts by state, lists the most contested states first and denotes whether you’ve called them or not.

An Unlikely Lens

Andrew Rasiej, co-founder of techPresident, which tracks “how the candidates are using the web, and how the web is using them,” sees the change through the unlikely lens of his 82-year-old father.

Rasiej said his father would never have called friends to promote a candidate or send out mailings in previous elections — that would have seemed too overt. But he has been e-mailing YouTube videos of Obama to friends, something Rasiej said seems more akin to talking around the dinner table with friends.

“The technology has allowed my father to become a 21st-century pamphleteer,” he said.

And getting supporters to spread a candidate’s message can translate into more than free promotion. Both candidates have capitalized on emerging technology, Rasiej said, but Obama in particular has managed to mobilize an online community. If Obama wins, it will not be just because he ran a good campaign, he said.

“Obama’s success is because people created their own campaigns for him,” Rasiej said. “The people who’ve been supporting him and working for him, whether they’ve been tied to the campaign directly or whether they’ve been doing something on their own, they have a sense of ownership. They feel responsible for his success.”

For young people fluent in technology, campaigning any other way might seem quaint. Dan Levine, field coordinator of Wesleyan Students for Barack Obama, is 19 and working on his first presidential campaign, running phone banks similar to the ones at Yale.

He said it hadn’t occurred to him that this year’s use of technology on the campaign might represent something new.

“A lot of that I take for granted,” he said.

But Elissa Voccola, 21, president of the College Republicans at Western Connecticut State University, has noticed a difference. She volunteered for President Bush‘s campaigns in 2000 and 2004 and now campaigns for 5th District congressional candidate David Cappiello.

It’s now automatic to look up a candidate’s profile on Facebook or MySpace to see how many supporters he or she has, Voccola said. She and other students involved in politics routinely use Facebook to recruit members and announce meetings or events. This election season, she tends to communicate with fellow volunteers through text messages.

“It’s more centered around my cellphone and my computer than it’s ever been,” Voccola said.

Convenience

The ease of participating in the campaign helped pull in Emma Sokoloff-Rubin.

The Yale sophomore was on her way to the library to write a paper when she stopped by the common room to sign up for a weekend trip to campaign in Pennsylvania and noticed the student phone bank. She figured she could make some calls — after all, she already had her laptop and cellphone.

Like many of the phone bank volunteers, Sokoloff-Rubin, 19, said she wanted to know she had done her part for Obama’s campaign. But she doesn’t have a car or large blocks of free time, so going anywhere to volunteer regularly would be difficult. A phone bank on campus that she could drop by on the way to the library made perfect sense.

She ended each call or message by urging the person on the other end to vote, no matter which candidate, and offered a toll-free number to call for any questions about voting.

Nearby, someone bragged about having reached 30 people. Of course, Sokoloff-Rubin said, at Yale it’s competitive.

While the well-funded Obama campaign has been at the forefront of technology, Tim Plungis, co-chairman of the College Republicans at the University of Connecticut, said he expects technology increasingly will be used to benefit candidates with fewer resources.

Campaigns can put out commercials on YouTube for free, and phone banks using everyday people at home — Mitt Romney‘s primary campaign used them — mean lots of work can be done by volunteers with minimal overhead. As the electorate gets more used to the Internet, Plungis predicted the features young people use to campaign now will become increasingly popular.

The co-directors of Yale for Obama, Ben Lazarus and Jacob Koch, are already thinking about how the networks they and other campaign organization have built will evolve after the election. Already, Lazarus said, college students and grass-roots participants have become more powerful in this election cycle than ever before.

“When else in history could a college kid in Connecticut log on to his computer and identify a key swing voter in a key swing state, call that person, talk to them about the election, then record it and instantly send that information that they’ve recovered into the central campaign database?” Lazarus said.





llamadas desinfectadas

31 07 2008

En Colombia, a propósito del uso de la telefonía móvil, se creó un nuevo tipo de oficio, las denominadas “vendedoras de minutos”, quienes recorren las calles vendiendo minutos de telefonía móvil al menudeo. En Colombia, cerca del 75% de la población posee un terminal móvil, y más de un 80% tiene tarjetas de prepago. La mayoría sólo recibe llamadas, pero cuando necesitan hacer llamadas recurren a estos vendedores de minutos, ya que su oferta por el precio del minuto es más conveniente. Ahora, además estos vendedores han agregado un nuevo servicio, las llamadas desinfectadas, es decir, limpiar los terminales móviles con alcohol, con el fin de prevenir la transmisión de enfermedades virales y evitar que el teléfono móvil sea un foco de infecciones.

Este nuevo servicio no es fruto del azar, es más, fue el propio Ministerio de salud de Colombia el que elaboró un informe en el que consta que existen “33 mil bacterias por metro cuadrado que guarda en su interior un teléfono móvil callejero”. Por tanto, cuando un usuario realice una llamada debe “poner un pañuelo entre la oreja y el auricular del teléfono, no pegar la boca a la bocina, tampoco la oreja al auricular y, si tiene heridas abiertas en el labio, en la oreja, en la cara o en las manos, absténgase de usar el teléfono móvil callejero”.





llamadas desinfectadas

31 07 2008

En Colombia, a propósito del uso de la telefonía móvil, se creó un nuevo tipo de oficio, las denominadas "vendedoras de minutos", quienes recorren las calles vendiendo minutos de telefonía móvil al menudeo. En Colombia, cerca del 75% de la población posee un terminal móvil, y más de un 80% tiene tarjetas de prepago. La mayoría sólo recibe llamadas, pero cuando necesitan hacer llamadas recurren a estos vendedores de minutos, ya que su oferta por el precio del minuto es más conveniente. Ahora, además estos vendedores han agregado un nuevo servicio, las llamadas desinfectadas, es decir, limpiar los terminales móviles con alcohol, con el fin de prevenir la transmisión de enfermedades virales y evitar que el teléfono móvil sea un foco de infecciones.

Este nuevo servicio no es fruto del azar, es más, fue el propio Ministerio de salud de Colombia el que elaboró un informe en el que consta que existen "33 mil bacterias por metro cuadrado que guarda en su interior un teléfono móvil callejero". Por tanto, cuando un usuario realice una llamada debe "poner un pañuelo entre la oreja y el auricular del teléfono, no pegar la boca a la bocina, tampoco la oreja al auricular y, si tiene heridas abiertas en el labio, en la oreja, en la cara o en las manos, absténgase de usar el teléfono móvil callejero".





Sedentarismo móvil

5 06 2008

En la BBC y en El País se informa sobre los resultados de una investigación que rastreó el paradero de más de 100000 usuarios de telefonía móvil en un intento de construir una imagen completa de los movimientos humanos, dirigido por el profesor Albert-Laszlo Barbasi de la Northeastern University, Boston, EE.UU

El estudio publicado en la Revista Nature concluye que los seres humanos son criaturas de hábitos predecibles, en su mayoría visitan los mismos lugares una y otra vez, siguiendo pautas sencillas y reproducibles, y en un radio no superior a los 10 kilómetros. Mi pregunta es: Ante esta misma investigación y con el nivel de material recogido, un equipo de investigadores proveniente de las Ciencias Sociales se hubiese preguntado lo mismo.

En la dinámica cotidiana esto es cierto. Hay un eje, que puede ser el hogar o el trabajo, que articula un movimiento de rotación más que un movimiento de traslación. Vamos y volvemos en poco tiempo, recorremos la misma ruta y los mismos sitios. (nota aparte, una encuesta de la National Science Foundation reveló que la mitad de los norteamericanos no sabía que la tierra de la vuelta al sol en un año)

Lo interesante y el provecho que se le puede sacar a esta investigación no sólo se acota a cuánto nos movemos de aquií para allá. A simple vista, esta investigación supondría varias observaciones posibles: Un trastorno de la imagen de la “ciudad”, una contradicción espacial, la ciudad como “ilusión”, “no existe en ninguna parte”, hay una gran diferencia entre la ciudad que se percibe de la que se habita; el uso de las tecnologías móviles no impacta en el tipo de movimiento ni en los modelos de integración, sino más bien en el tipo de conexiones y en las formas instrumentales y expresivas de generar los vínculos con los miembros de la red más próxima; el tipo de movimiento como expresión de una urbanización de la esfera privada; grupos de la población que viven la experiencia del sedentarismo forzado, donde la inmovilidad es juzgado como un trastorno y otros que experimentan el mismo sedentarismo pero que emplean estrategias de consumo para vivir una parte de las imagenes y de los mensajes de la movilidad, ya que la movilidad espacial, en cuanto tal, le es inaccesible, no pueden ir más cerca, producto de las barreras y fronteras existentes; los movimientos de traslación representan a los grupos más desfavorecidos que se desplazan hacia grandes distancias representando la migración global, entre otras.

Lo cierto es que estos resultados, tal como se presentan, implica que la tecnología de la telefonía móvil es una buena oportunidad de negocio para la industria de la Vigilancia y el Control. Precisamente donde más innovaciones se han realizado es en los sistemas de localización, búsqueda y georeferenciación. El MIT y el modelo de tráfico en Roma; En Los Angeles han desarrollado un “paparazzi móvil” cuya aplicación permite saber en tiempo real dónde está cada “famoso”; la policía también lo utiliza para identificar los movimientos de sospechosos de delitos; Telefónica ofeece un servicio de Localización del móvil, el que permite a los padres saber “en teoría” dónde están sus hijos viendo en el mapa el moviemiento del teléfono móvil.





Sedentarismo m óvil

5 06 2008

En la BBC y en El País se informa sobre los resultados de una investigación que rastreó el paradero de más de 100000 usuarios de telefonía móvil en un intento de construir una imagen completa de los movimientos humanos, dirigido por el profesor Albert-Laszlo Barbasi de la Northeastern University, Boston, EE.UU

El estudio publicado en la Revista Nature concluye que los seres humanos son criaturas de hábitos predecibles, en su mayoría visitan los mismos lugares una y otra vez, siguiendo pautas sencillas y reproducibles, y en un radio no superior a los 10 kilómetros. Mi pregunta es: Ante esta misma investigación y con el nivel de material recogido, un equipo de investigadores proveniente de las Ciencias Sociales se hubiese preguntado lo mismo.

En la dinámica cotidiana esto es cierto. Hay un eje, que puede ser el hogar o el trabajo, que articula un movimiento de rotación más que un movimiento de traslación. Vamos y volvemos en poco tiempo, recorremos la misma ruta y los mismos sitios. (nota aparte, una encuesta de la National Science Foundation reveló que la mitad de los norteamericanos no sabía que la tierra de la vuelta al sol en un año)

Lo interesante y el provecho que se le puede sacar a esta investigación no sólo se acota a cuánto nos movemos de aquií para allá. A simple vista, esta investigación supondría varias observaciones posibles: Un trastorno de la imagen de la "ciudad", una contradicción espacial, la ciudad como "ilusión", "no existe en ninguna parte", hay una gran diferencia entre la ciudad que se percibe de la que se habita; el uso de las tecnologías móviles no impacta en el tipo de movimiento ni en los modelos de integración, sino más bien en el tipo de conexiones y en las formas instrumentales y expresivas de generar los vínculos con los miembros de la red más próxima; el tipo de movimiento como expresión de una urbanización de la esfera privada; grupos de la población que viven la experiencia del sedentarismo forzado, donde la inmovilidad es juzgado como un trastorno y otros que experimentan el mismo sedentarismo pero que emplean estrategias de consumo para vivir una parte de las imagenes y de los mensajes de la movilidad, ya que la movilidad espacial, en cuanto tal, le es inaccesible, no pueden ir más cerca, producto de las barreras y fronteras existentes; los movimientos de traslación representan a los grupos más desfavorecidos que se desplazan hacia grandes distancias representando la migración global, entre otras.

Lo cierto es que estos resultados, tal como se presentan, implica que la tecnología de la telefonía móvil es una buena oportunidad de negocio para la industria de la Vigilancia y el Control. Precisamente donde más innovaciones se han realizado es en los sistemas de localización, búsqueda y georeferenciación. El MIT y el modelo de tráfico en Roma; En Los Angeles han desarrollado un "paparazzi móvil" cuya aplicación permite saber en tiempo real dónde está cada "famoso"; la policía también lo utiliza para identificar los movimientos de sospechosos de delitos; Telefónica ofeece un servicio de Localización del móvil, el que permite a los padres saber "en teoría" dónde están sus hijos viendo en el mapa el moviemiento del teléfono móvil.